Infinium

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Type: Old Ale
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  • 10.30% 
  • 1435/3686 
Commercial Description

Our brewers worked for two years with the world’s oldest brewery, Germany’s Weihenstephan, to create this unique new beer style. A groundbreaking brew, made with only the four traditional ingredients: malted barley, hops, water and yeast, Infinium™ is a crisp champagne-like beer with fine bubbles and a fruity, spicy aroma. The crisp clean malt character and delicate fruit notes in this beer are complemented by a slight citrus flavor from dry hopping with Bavarian Noble hops. Bottle conditioning adds another layer of complexity and light spice notes.

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Reviews: 5

  • Aug 12, 2011
    TheCorkStops (70)Rank: Beer AmateurGroup: Barley Wine
    4.3
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    • This review is Very Helpful
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    So, the much awaited Infinium, the collaboration between Samuel Adams (Boston Beer Company) and Weihenstephan of Germany. I have to be honest here, I'm having majorly mixed emotions about this brew. I mean, Samuel Adams has become that mildly annoying, used-to-be craft brewer that I get tired of hearing about. Yeah, yeah, I know, you like their Octoberfest, and so does my 22yr old cousin. Big deal.

    On the other hand, Weihenstephan is the world's oldest brewery, and produces 2 of my top 20 favorite beers. They've been around for over 900 years, and I've been making the joke that "Weihenstephan has been around longer than Christianity."

    So, the Infinium is a collaboration between the two, boasting over 1,000 years of brewing expertise. The concept behind this brew was to "remain true to the Reinheitagebot", which was a German purity law from the year 1516. The foundation of the Reinheitagebot being that you can only use the four classic ingredients to make a beer: malt, hops, water and yeast. From that concept, and two years of hard work, arises Infinium.

    The tag on the bottle describes Infinium as a "champagne-like" beer, with fine bubbles, and a fruity, spicy aroma. It also suggests serving the beer fairly cold, about 40-42 degrees Fahrenheit, as well as consuming before July 2011. So, without further adieu, let's pop the cork!

    I have to tell you, right off the bat, the description from Sam Adams is right on the money! It pours a light golden-amber color, with plenty of carbonation and a nice thick head. The foam is just slightly off-white, with a mild to medium amount of sticky lacing. The aromas, however, are nearly out of control! I'm getting just a tiny backbone of hops, mostly the soft, floral, funky kind of hops. There's plenty of soft floral, fruity characters, as well as some nice earthiness and German/Belgian style funk.

    Once I take a sip, the flavors nearly knock me off my seat! There is layer after layer of new flavors! There's some soft, smooth hops, just a touch of malty sweetness, as well as some citrus and wheat notes reminding me of a hefe. Everytime I take a sip, there's more to taste. There's just a bit of funk, earthiness, and yet still light and drinkable.

    At just over 10% abv, I'm not getting any alcohol burn at all. The beer is so seemless and structured that I am mildly amazed. Seriously, Sam Adams, why can't you brew beers like this all the time?!
  • Mar 23, 2011
    kaj-ii (778)Rank: Beer ConnoisseurGroup: Brown Ale Lovers
    3.9
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    • This review is Helpful
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    [Best served in a Trappist glass]

    Poured a sparkling dark yellow almost gold in color with an average sized fizzy head that dissapated rapidly and had poor lacing. The aroma was of a grain malt, a light flowery hop and a sweet yeast with intense notes of pineapple, banana and orange's. It tasted sweet and acidic and very yeasty at first and then became bitter-sweet with nice hints of fruit and a mild alcohol finish. Mouthfeel was light to medium in body and syrupy in texture with a fizzy carbonation. Overall a fantastic Belgian style ale one I will definitely have to get again.

  • Feb 23, 2011
    madcaddie_foley (37)Rank: Beer NoviceGroup: Georgia Guzzlers
    4.6
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    I won’t compete with Lucklys’ in-depth review of Infinium but I will agree with the opinion of it being a hybrid of sorts between champagne and beer. It really is delicious and should be at least tried by any/all fans of beer!
  • Feb 21, 2011
    lucklys (49)Rank: Beer DrinkerGroup: IPA Lovers
    4.3
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    • This review is Very Helpful
    • 4/5
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    The Infinium poured a crystal clear amber with bright golden highlights shining wherever the light caught it. It was obvious from the very beginning that this beer was going to have more champagne characteristics, especially when I poured it and a huge 4-finger thick head of large, clean bubbles built up effortlessly, threatening to spill over the sides. Unfortunately, the head didn't last long and quickly fell into a few carbonation-fueled islands of small rapidly popping bubbles. Throughout the duration of the drink, there were lots of champagne bubble lines constantly flowing from the bottom and sides of the glass that transferred over into the mouthfeel quite a bit.

    I was surprised when I initially smelled mashed bananas in the light aroma, but they were well balanced by snippets of cloves, sweet malts, light sprinklings of brown sugar and slight hints of apple cider that came through as it warmed. There were some very quiet hints of light wheat and a yeast (which I've seen referred to as a Belgian yeast) seemed to pop out once in a while with the bubbles, while something bready - almost doughy - hid in the background. It was a nice clean smell with very little discernible alcohol in the nose, and was a nice combination of beer and champagne, neither really overwhelming the other.

    As soon as it hit my tongue, there was a distinct sharp green apple tartness that really surprised me as it was very reminiscent of a bright cider, but with nice full carbonation, which was more of a champagne quality. Despite the initial shock of sour apple, it easily transformed into softer sweet, chewy, bready malts and the belgian yeast with a touch of spice swirling around golden delicious apples. The mouthfeel was very smooth, creamy and refreshing and I found it very difficult to detect the 10% alcohol in the taste - that presented itself in a nice warming sensation that built gradually. Overall, I think I've decided that this beer is more like a heavy champagne than any kind of beer, even though it nicely holds qualities from both categories. I do not think many beverages, regardless of what they are made of or where/how they are made, are worth $20 , but that is no reason for me to go and rip apart how this beer let me down, was a disappointment, or didn't live up to my expectations. If I were to go into every beer (or any experience for that matter) expecting to encounter every good rumor and all the built-up hype I had heard about it, I would be severely disappointed with a lot of things in life. How could I be happy? Instead, I went into this beer ignoring what everyone else had said and had my own wonderful experience with it. I really enjoyed all of the different components that brought it together and would gladly buy it again for a special occasion if it were continued.
  • Feb 21, 2011
    maschm (9)Rank: Beer NoviceGroup: Ease Beer Team
    4.6
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    • This review is Somewhat Helpful
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    This beer is brewed in strict adherence to the German Purity Beer Laws. They have definitely pushed in the envelope. They say it should be served in Champagne glasses which fits its character. It is slightly spicy which gives it a unique flavor. Well worth trying.